Literary Blog Tour

Hey there! The fabulous Erica Sklar asked me to participate in this tag-you’re-it style interview. Here goes…

What are you working on right now?

My MFA thesis. Saying thesis is less scary than saying novel, but it is, in fact, a novel (quick summary/tagline for the movie adaptation: identity thieves in love). I’m at the point where I’ve just doubled back around to the beginning to revise the early chapters, which were written in 2012, and now need to be drastically altered for anything to make any sense.

I also have some story & essay ideas floating around that I hope to work on when I need a break from the book. This weekend my main secondary project was writing a birth plan, though. How’s THAT for a deadline?

How does your work differ from others in its genre?

Honestly this is the sort of question you want someone else to answer for/about you, not to answer about yourself. Comparison, thief of joy, right? Anyway, I write about women committing crimes a lot (and/or transgressing some kind of social boundary). I write about class and money a lot. I like to think my writing is kind of funny. Not that any of those things are unique, but at least they’re identifiable attributes.

Why do you write what you do?

If an idea or a character or a news story or an experience or a phrase or an image sticks in my mind long enough that I use it for material, I am trying to figure out why I am so interested in it and communicate that to a reader and hopefully make it interesting for the reader. Or sometimes maybe I am trying to work out some kind of emotional thing for myself and maybe that results in something others want to read and hey, maybe it doesn’t! They can’t all be winners. 

How does your writing process work?

My process is pretty erratic, which is something I feel bad about, and something I hoped an MFA program would help me fix. But instead of feeling bad, I’m just trying to acknowledge that I am not an everyday writer and probably won’t ever be, and it is all going to be OK as long as I don’t give up entirely. I try and block out weekend days for myself, making no other social plans, and either write from bed or trek out to a coffee shop or the library. Sometimes I grab an hour here or there on a weekday. But I am what another writer-friend once called a “burster,” prone to writing in long fits (accompanied by lots of snacks) with dry spells in between. Editing is a little less manic, and I like to do that after I have let the original version “rest” for a while. It’s easier to see mistakes when you’ve had long enough to forget what you wrote in the first place.


STAY TUNED for the responses from four writers of my choosing! (I still, uh, have to ask them…)

"Our Love in Space"

kathleenejones:

My poem “Our Love in Space” came out today in Stirring: A Literary Collection. I love Stirring so I’m super excited. The issue is available online, so please check it out!

Katie! Jones! Making our former neighborhood’s giant yellow spiders seem beautiful instead of terrifying!

(669) 221-6251

feminist-phone-intervention:

next time someone demands your digits and you want to get out of the situation, you can give them this number: (669) 221-6251.

when the person calls or texts, an automatically-generated quotation from feminist writer bell hooks will respond for you.

protect your privacy while dropping some…

a girl i sorta know from college made this thing

whilecinemavisionsdancedinmyhead:

F for Fake (1973)

whilecinemavisionsdancedinmyhead:

F for Fake (1973)

Disco Hootenanny, Clark Park, May 17, 2014

gifiltefish:

handcrafted GIFs by Ben Firestone, set of 10

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west phillllllllllyyyyyyyyyy

bridgeghazi:

professionallush:

onesmallfire:

photo by carlygmarie
Preach it, Neko.

DONT PEGGY OLSEN ME

SLOW CLAP.
I LOVE YOU NEKO.

bridgeghazi:

professionallush:

onesmallfire:

photo by carlygmarie

Preach it, Neko.

DONT PEGGY OLSEN ME

SLOW CLAP.

I LOVE YOU NEKO.

(via michellerosepa)

therumpus:


Based on the popular Tumblr pen & ink, Fitzgerald (books editor at BuzzFeed) and illustrator MacNaughton (Lost Cat) bring their inspired collaboration to the page. The premise is simple: Fitzgerald and MacNaughton asked online readers to submit an image of their tattoo and its story. The book features 63 tattoos, with text that answers questions including: the reason for the tattoo, the individual’s name and profession. Drawn in a whimsical, tender style, MacNaughton’s portraits are captivating in their intimacy: the lower half of a hirsute man with his pants down, a skateboarding bear on his right thigh; a student peeling down her lower lip to expose the words “I forget” in black ink. The accompanying explanations, some of which are entertainingly straightforward (a fondness for pizza) and others that tell a darker story (a celebration of survival after a sexual assault), demonstrate resilience and imagination. Without judgment or regret, this emotionally raw collection, featuring an introduction by Cheryl Strayed, explores how we find permanence in an impermanent world. As MacNaughton says of her very first tattoo, “What the tattoo does prove is that Wendy, like most 19-year olds, used to take things very seriously, and that things change.”

Nonfiction Book Review: Pen & Ink: Tattoos & the Stories Behind Them by Isaac Fitzgerald and Wendy MacNaughton
Um, yes.

Hey unless they edited me out, I am in this book!

therumpus:

Based on the popular Tumblr pen & ink, Fitzgerald (books editor at BuzzFeed) and illustrator MacNaughton (Lost Cat) bring their inspired collaboration to the page. The premise is simple: Fitzgerald and MacNaughton asked online readers to submit an image of their tattoo and its story. The book features 63 tattoos, with text that answers questions including: the reason for the tattoo, the individual’s name and profession. Drawn in a whimsical, tender style, MacNaughton’s portraits are captivating in their intimacy: the lower half of a hirsute man with his pants down, a skateboarding bear on his right thigh; a student peeling down her lower lip to expose the words “I forget” in black ink. The accompanying explanations, some of which are entertainingly straightforward (a fondness for pizza) and others that tell a darker story (a celebration of survival after a sexual assault), demonstrate resilience and imagination. Without judgment or regret, this emotionally raw collection, featuring an introduction by Cheryl Strayed, explores how we find permanence in an impermanent world. As MacNaughton says of her very first tattoo, “What the tattoo does prove is that Wendy, like most 19-year olds, used to take things very seriously, and that things change.”

Nonfiction Book Review: Pen & Ink: Tattoos & the Stories Behind Them by Isaac Fitzgerald and Wendy MacNaughton

Um, yes.

Hey unless they edited me out, I am in this book!

As Court Fees Rise, The Poor Are Paying The Price

getmetoanunnery:

Susan Miller how are you ALWAYS getting sick/having computer problems right before the new horoscopes are supposed to go up. How hard is it to tell me not to have plastic surgery until the 15th because Venus is backwards or whatever.

millionsmillions:

Parentheses aren’t just the mark of a lazy or verbose writer. They can also bracket personal pain in a narrative. At The New York Review of Books, Christopher Benfey explores the power of the parenthetical detail, such as Lolita‘s “My very photogenic mother died in a freak accident (picnic, lightning) when I was three.” Pair with: Vulture’s “The 5 Best Punctuation Marks in Literature.”

millionsmillions:

Parentheses aren’t just the mark of a lazy or verbose writer. They can also bracket personal pain in a narrative. At The New York Review of Books, Christopher Benfey explores the power of the parenthetical detail, such as Lolitas “My very photogenic mother died in a freak accident (picnic, lightning) when I was three.” Pair with: Vulture’sThe 5 Best Punctuation Marks in Literature.”